Brewers Prospects

Milwaukee Brewers: Ranking the top 20 prospects

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MILWAUKEE, WI - MAY 28: Fans watch the game between the Milwaukee Brewers and the Arizona Diamondbacks at Miller Park on May 28, 2017 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. (Photo by Dylan Buell/Getty Images)
MILWAUKEE, WI - MAY 28: Fans watch the game between the Milwaukee Brewers and the Arizona Diamondbacks at Miller Park on May 28, 2017 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. (Photo by Dylan Buell/Getty Images) /
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16- Trey Supak RHP (16)

Supak throws an above average curveball and fastball. He also throws an average change-up, with average control. He has the makings of a successful Major League pitcher.

His three average or better pitches will help him as he progresses. He throws his fastball in the low 90’s with decent control. His curveball will help keep hitters off-balance. Only 21 years old, there is a lot of work to be done.

With his 6’5″ frame, Supak could be able to become an innings eater in the middle of the Milwaukee Brewers rotation. This season pitching for the Carolina Mud Cats, he has struggled with a 4.78 ERA through nine starts.

For his career, he has shown solid ability to limit walks. This season, he has allowed 21 walks with 50 strikeouts, in 58 1/3 innings for Carolina. In 99 1/3 innings, with the Wisconsin Timber Rattlers earlier this year, Supak had only 31 walks while striking out 103. He has shown good command of the strike zone already, and this attribute should only improve with time.

15- Monte Harrison OF (14)

Harrison has struggled to stay on the field early in his career in the Milwaukee Brewers system. A second round draft pick in 2014, this season is his healthiest as a professional.

His numbers don’t exactly jump off the page. Through two levels of the Minor Leagues, in 91 games, his batting line is .257/.347/.465. Those 91 games are already the most he has played in a single season.

With 18 stolen bases in 21 attempts this season, he shows good ability on the basepaths. That speed also translates well to the outfield. His scouting report grades him out as a plus runner, and it has shown.

He also received an above average grade for his fielding. Harrison also has a cannon for an arm. He will be able to play anywhere in the outfield. The question with him, is whether he will hit enough to reach the Major Leagues.

With his injury setbacks, Harrison is a little behind where he should be. The good thing for him, the Milwaukee Brewers won’t have a need for an outfielder any time soon. He will have plenty of time to refine his approach at the plate. In time, he will contribute to a Major League roster.

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