Brewers History

Milwaukee Brewers: The Top 5 First Basemen in Franchise History

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ST LOUIS, MO - OCTOBER 13: Prince Fielder #28 of the Milwaukee Brewers gestures after he hit a double in the top of the fourth inning against the St. Louis Cardinals during Game 4 of the National League Championship Series at Busch Stadium on October 13, 2011 in St. Louis, Missouri. (Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images)
ST LOUIS, MO - OCTOBER 13: Prince Fielder #28 of the Milwaukee Brewers gestures after he hit a double in the top of the fourth inning against the St. Louis Cardinals during Game 4 of the National League Championship Series at Busch Stadium on October 13, 2011 in St. Louis, Missouri. (Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images) /
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MILWAUKEE, WI – APRIL 7: Milwaukee Brewers ball cap and gloves are left on the dugout steps during the game against the San Francisco Giants at Miller Park on April 18, 2013 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. (Photo by Tom Lynn/Getty Images) /

3. George Scott

Years as a Brewer: 1972-1976

Scott is an interesting case. He actually spent the bulk of his career with the Boston Red Sox. He also spent a good chunk of time as an everyday third baseman. However, “Boomer” was almost exclusively a first baseman for the Milwaukee Brewers – and a pretty good one, too.

Scott arrived in Milwaukee via a trade in October of 1971. He immediately took over as the Brewers’ top option at first base. He nearly logged a 20-20 season in his first season with the club, then led the league in home runs and RBI just a few years later. This helped him produce a .283/.342/.456 slash line in his five years with the Brew Crew.

In 1975, Scott led the league with 36 homers and 109 RBIs. He also knocked in 107 runs in 1973. Through all five seasons with the Milwaukee Brewers, Scott never posted an OPS+ below 121 and received MVP votes his first four years as a member of the Crew.

His bat wasn’t his only selling point, either. Scott was an excellent defender, as his eight Gold Glove awards would suggest. He actually won five of those with the Brewers; one in each season in Milwaukee. This all seems like a compelling case for the top spot on this list, but he didn’t spend as much time in Milwaukee as the two names ahead of him.

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