Brewers History

Milwaukee Brewers: The Top 5 Catchers In Franchise History

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(Photo by Tom Lynn/Getty Images)
(Photo by Tom Lynn/Getty Images) /
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MILWAUKEE, WI – APRIL 24: Baseball hats with the current logo, left, and retro logo sit on display at Miller Park on April 24, 2016 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. (Photo by Dylan Buell/Getty Images) *** Local Caption ***
MILWAUKEE, WI – APRIL 24: Baseball hats with the current logo, left, and retro logo sit on display at Miller Park on April 24, 2016 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. (Photo by Dylan Buell/Getty Images) *** Local Caption *** /

When we think back to great players that have worn the Milwaukee Brewers uniform over the years, a few that come to mind are Paul Molitor, Rollie Fingers, Robin Yount and others. However, an often-overlooked position in Brewers history is the catcher position.

Since the Brewers came to Milwaukee in 1970, we haven’t seen many big names come through at catcher, but we have had some talented players set up behind home plate. Including two that helped us reach the 1982 World Series, several All-Star appearances and some individual Brewers record holders.

Below I ranked the top five Brewers catchers in the team’s history, including an honorable mention. The criteria to make this list considers a number of statistical categories, playoff performances, and I only factored into the rankings their time in Milwaukee. Let the fun begin!

Honorable Mention: Darrell Porter

Years as a Brewer: 1971-1976

Getting his first start as a Brewer at 19 years old, Porter spent the first six seasons of his MLB career with the Brewers. During his time in Milwaukee, he had a batting average of .229 with 54 home runs, 226 RBIs, and an OPS of .709.

His time here also included a third place finish in the Rookie of the Year voting in 1973 and an All-Star appearance in 1974. Most of his production as a Brewer came in a four-year span (1973-1976), as he only appeared in 40 games through his first two years.

However, in his final season with Milwaukee in 1976, he saw his batting average, home runs, and RBIs all drop off drastically from where they had been in the past three seasons. The following season, he was no longer a Brewer and had moved on to the Kansas City Royals.

Fast forward to the 1982 season as a St. Louis Cardinal, Porter was huge factor in deciding the World Series as he was named World Series MVP. During the series he posted a batting average of .286, with one home run and five RBIs. And as we all remember that was against the Brewers, another reason he can’t be included in the top five (I’m not bitter).

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