Brewers History

Milwaukee Brewers: 5 former prospects from the 90s lost to history

Matthew Dewoskin
FORT BRAGG, NC - JULY 03: A detailed view of baseballs prior to the game between the Miami Marlins and Atlanta Braves on July 3, 2016 in Fort Bragg, North Carolina. The Fort Bragg Game marks the first regular season MLB game ever to be played on an active military base. (Photo by Streeter Lecka/Getty Images)
FORT BRAGG, NC - JULY 03: A detailed view of baseballs prior to the game between the Miami Marlins and Atlanta Braves on July 3, 2016 in Fort Bragg, North Carolina. The Fort Bragg Game marks the first regular season MLB game ever to be played on an active military base. (Photo by Streeter Lecka/Getty Images) /
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Antone Williamson

The Milwaukee Brewers thought they were getting a power-hitting corner infielder when they selected Antone Williamson fourth overall out of Arizona State in 1994. Williamson posted an OPS over 1.000 in his Sophomore and Junior years, and was expected to develop into a franchise cornerstone.

He was rated as the 64th best prospect in baseball in 1995, and the 81st best prospect in 1996.

In six Minor League seasons, Williamson posted a .276/.360/.420 slash line. The problem is that he only hit 28 homers…total. Williamson blasted more homers in three years of college than he did in six years as a professional.

Despite his power outage, Williamson actually earned a cup of coffee with the Milwaukee Brewers. After putting together a .286/.389/.434 slash line for the Tucson Toros in Triple-A in 1997, Williamson made 24 appearances for the Brewers. In his only taste of Major League action, Williamson slashed .204/.254/.259 with zero homers.

He spent the next two years at the higher levels of the Minor Leagues before trying his luck in the independent Texas-Louisiana League. Williamson was out of baseball before the millennium.

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