Brewers Draft: 3 Team Needs To Address In 2021 MLB Draft

MILWAUKEE, WI - JULY 03: A detail view of the Independence Day Milwaukee Brewers batting helmet logo before the game against the Baltimore Orioles at Miller Park on July 03, 2017 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. (Photo by Dylan Buell/Getty Images) *** Local Caption ***
MILWAUKEE, WI - JULY 03: A detail view of the Independence Day Milwaukee Brewers batting helmet logo before the game against the Baltimore Orioles at Miller Park on July 03, 2017 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. (Photo by Dylan Buell/Getty Images) *** Local Caption *** /
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MILWAUKEE, WI – JULY 03: A detail view of the Independence Day Milwaukee Brewers batting helmet logo before the game against the Baltimore Orioles at Miller Park on July 03, 2017 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. (Photo by Dylan Buell/Getty Images) *** Local Caption *** /

Brewers Draft Need #2: Power Bats

In what has been atypical of the Brewers historically, they find themselves short on power bats. The big league offense has Avisail Garcia and Luis Urias currently leading the team in home runs. If you had those two as your team HR leaders at the All Star Break when the season began, people would’ve rightfully called you crazy.

There also isn’t much for power bats down in the minor leagues either. The Brewers focused on adding advanced college bats in last year’s draft, but most of them were hit-over-power type players. Garrett Mitchell has a ridiculous amount of raw power, but he’s not a “power hitter”. Freddy Zamora, Zavier Warren, Joey Wiemer, and Hayden Cantrelle all have some pop, but they’re also not really considered “power hitters”.

Mario Feliciano has power, but has been hurt for most of the minor league season.  Other than that, there’s Tristen Lutz who has big power, but is hitting just .208 with a 36% K rate in Double-A this year, although he has hit seven homers. Outfielder Luis Medina has big juice but is 18 years old and is in Rookie level Arizona. C/1B Thomas Dillard has eight homers in High-A and is hitting .249 but has a 42% strikeout rate.

That’s about it for “power-hitting” prospects in this system.

They could use a couple more hitters with power upside. They have one of the more power-friendly ballparks in baseball. Milwaukee needs to use that to its advantage.

Unfortunately there isn’t a large amount of power-hitting college bats in this year’s draft class, but the few that are there will be at a premium.

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