10 Milwaukee Brewers Records That Will Likely Never Be Broken Again

CHICAGO - UNDATED 1983: Paul Molitor (R) and Robin Yount (L) of the Milwaukee Brewers pose before an MLB game at Comiskey Park in Chicago, Illinois. Molitor played with the Milwaukee Brewers from 1978-1992. Yount Played with the Milwaukee Brewers from 1974-1993. (Photo by Ron Vesely/MLB Photos via Getty Images)
CHICAGO - UNDATED 1983: Paul Molitor (R) and Robin Yount (L) of the Milwaukee Brewers pose before an MLB game at Comiskey Park in Chicago, Illinois. Molitor played with the Milwaukee Brewers from 1978-1992. Yount Played with the Milwaukee Brewers from 1974-1993. (Photo by Ron Vesely/MLB Photos via Getty Images) /
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CHICAGO – UNDATED 1983: Paul Molitor (R) and Robin Yount (L) of the Milwaukee Brewers pose before an MLB game at Comiskey Park in Chicago, Illinois. Molitor played with the Milwaukee Brewers from 1978-1992. Yount Played with the Milwaukee Brewers from 1974-1993. (Photo by Ron Vesely/MLB Photos via Getty Images) /

There’s an old saying that “records are meant to be broken”. But not in every situation. The Milwaukee Brewers have their share of records that aren’t going to be broken anytime soon, possibly ever again.

Record books serve to remind us of the incredible performances of seasons and careers past. Changes are made all the time, and the way the game is evolving means some records are experiencing a lot more turnover than others. However, it also means that some records may not experience any more turnover.

Some performances are also just so historic and good that they just cannot practically be expected to be broken, no matter how the game evolves.

This article will cover all kinds of these records, who holds them, and why they won’t be broken again. Here are 10 Milwaukee Brewers franchise records that will never be broken again.

Brewers record that will likely never be broken #1

Batting Average – Single season

Record: 1987 – Paul Molitor – .353 average

Paul Molitor was one of the best hitters of all time, especially in Brewers history, which is why his name is hanging in the rafters at American Family Field. His 1987 season was one of his best years ever. He led the league with 41 doubles and 114 runs scored. Molitor also posted the highest single season batting average of his career, hitting .353 on the year.

Shockingly, his .353 average did not win him the batting title that season as Wade Boggs had a .363 average for the Boston Red Sox. Still, it set a franchise record for the Milwaukee Brewers.

And that’s a franchise record that’s not likely to be touched again.

Let’s take a look at the trends in the game of baseball. Baseball is no longer as worried about a hitter’s batting average as it used to be. Players are sacrificing batting average for more home runs, because that’s what gets them paid big money nowadays. Christian Yelich was able to win Milwaukee’s first batting titles hitting .326 and .329 in 2018 and 2019 respectively.

Yelich would have approximately another 25 points to go to reach Molitor’s record and that just may not be in the cards. Yelich may never reach that level of peak success again, although he still should be better than the numbers he put up in 2020 and 2021 going forward, but that’s beside the point.

The game of baseball has only seen four players in the last 15 non-shortened seasons post batting averages above Molitor’s record of .353. With the way the game is trending away from high batting averages and the way pitching is dominating the game, seeing someone break Molitor’s record is looking pretty unlikely.

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