Brewers History

10 Milwaukee Brewers Records That Will Likely Never Be Broken Again

CHICAGO - UNDATED 1983: Paul Molitor (R) and Robin Yount (L) of the Milwaukee Brewers pose before an MLB game at Comiskey Park in Chicago, Illinois. Molitor played with the Milwaukee Brewers from 1978-1992. Yount Played with the Milwaukee Brewers from 1974-1993. (Photo by Ron Vesely/MLB Photos via Getty Images)
CHICAGO - UNDATED 1983: Paul Molitor (R) and Robin Yount (L) of the Milwaukee Brewers pose before an MLB game at Comiskey Park in Chicago, Illinois. Molitor played with the Milwaukee Brewers from 1978-1992. Yount Played with the Milwaukee Brewers from 1974-1993. (Photo by Ron Vesely/MLB Photos via Getty Images) /
facebooktwitterreddit
Prev
8 of 8
Next
Brewers
Milwaukee Brewers pitcher Braden Looper gets a visit from pitching coach Chris Bosio against the Philadelphia Phillies at Miller Park on Sept. 26, 2009.Brewers27 Spt Sieu 3 /

Brewers record that will likely never be broken #10

Home Runs Allowed – Single season

Record: 2009 – Braden Looper – 39 home runs allowed

For the sake of the Milwaukee Brewers and all of us fans, let’s hope this record never gets broken.

For some inexplicable reason, the Brewers had Braden Looper start 34 games for them in 2009. He posted a 5.22 ERA and allowed a whopping 39 home runs. I’m surprised he didn’t miss time with a neck strain from all that whiplash of turning around and watching baseballs fly out of the ballpark.

Looper pitched 194.2 innings, had just 100 strikeouts, allowed over 10 hits per nine innings, and gave up 39 homers, and yet he had a 14-7 win-loss record. Keep in mind, Yovani Gallardo had a 3.73 ERA that year, made 30 starts, struck out 204, and yet had a 13-12 win-loss record. If that doesn’t prove to you that a pitcher’s win-loss record is meaningless and stupid, I don’t know what will, but I digress.

The next closest to Looper’s record is Wayne Franklin, who served up 36 long balls in 2003.

Hopefully, no Brewers pitcher will ever approach this record ever again. I don’t think any will, and not just because this current group is so good, but if a pitcher is struggling that bad with home run balls, teams will simply pull them. They won’t be afraid to either demote them or release them or put them in the bullpen or just simply take them off the field for a bit.

The Brewers should’ve simply taken Looper off the field at some point in 2009 but Ken Macha was too busy scratching his butt thinking that’s where his head was to figure it out. But my disdain for Macha is not the point, so again I digress.

Any pitcher that struggles as badly as Looper did with the long ball simply will not be around long enough and will not be allowed to pitch enough to reach Looper’s record.

One example is Corbin Burnes in 2019, He had 17 home runs allowed through 49 IP. Had the Brewers kept him in the rotation for 34 starts and let him throw 194 innings like they did with Looper, it’s quite likely Burnes would’ve surpassed Looper’s record. But, instead, the Brewers did the smart thing and demoted him before simply taking him off the field and fixing what was wrong.

Look at Burnes now, the reigning Cy Young winner. Clearly taking him off the field for a bit helped him fix those home run woes. Looper, meanwhile, was out of baseball after that 2009 season.

Hopefully his record never gets broken and it will stand forever as a reminder of how horrible he and Macha were and that no pitcher should be left out there long enough to allow 39 homers in a single season ever again.

Next. Ranking The 5 Worst Contracts In Brewers History. dark

Do you think any of these Brewers franchise records will be broken? Or are there other records that won’t ever be broken?

facebooktwitterreddit