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Brewers 2022 Trade Deadline: Instant Grades Of The Crew’s Deadline Deals

MIAMI, FLORIDA - SEPTEMBER 11: General manager David Stearns of the Milwaukee Brewers looks on prior to the game against the Miami Marlins at Marlins Park on September 11, 2019 in Miami, Florida. (Photo by Michael Reaves/Getty Images)
MIAMI, FLORIDA - SEPTEMBER 11: General manager David Stearns of the Milwaukee Brewers looks on prior to the game against the Miami Marlins at Marlins Park on September 11, 2019 in Miami, Florida. (Photo by Michael Reaves/Getty Images) /
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MIAMI, FLORIDA – SEPTEMBER 11: General manager David Stearns of the Milwaukee Brewers looks on prior to the game against the Miami Marlins at Marlins Park on September 11, 2019 in Miami, Florida. (Photo by Michael Reaves/Getty Images) /

Overall Brewers Deadline Grade: D

D is for Dud. This deadline gets a D from me. The Brewers didn’t quite sell, but it’s hard to argue they were much of a buyer either. They jumbled up and reshaped their bullpen. We’ll see how that ends up working out over the course of these final two months and they’ll certainly have no shortage of arms.

But it’s more so the trades they didn’t make that dropped down this grade. They didn’t help the offense at all. They got one position player, Ruiz, and immediately assigned him to Triple-A. He’s a very good prospect, but he’s not much of a sure thing for an offensive improvement just yet. Ruiz didn’t make his MLB debut until this year.

They didn’t get an established bat to plug into this offense, they didn’t help improve the consistency of the offense, and they didn’t improve the depth to withstand injuries.

The position player group is healthy right now, which they haven’t been all season. They’ve performed well when healthy. But as we all know, injuries happen. When these guys are hurt, the depth behind them isn’t great to fill that production. We’ve seen that all season. Not getting anyone to help with that makes little sense, especially after trading Hader.

For a first place team to trade their All Star closer at the Deadline and then not back it up with an acquisition of another impact player doesn’t make any sense. Clubhouses have lost trust in their front offices for a lot less. When Hader moved, it seemed as though they had more big things coming down the line. But they followed it with a dud.

Pedro Severino is still here and the Brewers continue to roll with three catchers, hurting their depth at other positions and hamstringing the bench. How is he still around?

The trade of Tristan Peters for Rosenthal is just infuriating. The Brewers have liked Rosenthal for a while but they massively overpaid to get him for just one month. He’s a free agent at the end of the season. To give up a good young hitter like Peters while also not improving the offense in any way adds to the frustration.

Typically, the mantra goes “In Stearns We Trust” and perhaps it still should be. He’s earned the benefit of the doubt at this point. But there’s an awful lot of doubt regarding this Deadline strategy. Either their strategy was blown up by another team’s moves, or this was just a poor strategy from the start.

Next. State of the Brewers Bullpen. dark

It’s not so much the moves themselves, except for the Peters-for-Rosenthal deal, but the moves they didn’t make and the impact the moves will have on the clubhouse. The rest of the locker room isn’t likely to take this Deadline very well.

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