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Brewers: The 10 Biggest Contracts in Franchise History

Jackson Heiden
Sep 26, 2021; Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA; Milwaukee Brewers left fielder Christian Yelich (22) takes in the scene after the team celebrated clinching the NL Central Division at American Family Field. Mandatory Credit: Benny Sieu-USA TODAY Sports
Sep 26, 2021; Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA; Milwaukee Brewers left fielder Christian Yelich (22) takes in the scene after the team celebrated clinching the NL Central Division at American Family Field. Mandatory Credit: Benny Sieu-USA TODAY Sports /
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Jul 22, 2015; Milwaukee, WI, USA; Milwaukee Brewers pitcher Kyle Lohse (26) pitches in the first inning against the Cleveland Indians at Miller Park. Mandatory Credit: Benny Sieu-USA TODAY Sports /

With the offseason officially upon us, that means it’s time to start looking ahead to the 2023 Milwaukee Brewers season, and that means we get to get out hopes up about the possibility of signing someone big in free agency.

The Brewers have never been known to make huge signings in free agency like the Dodgers or the Mets, but there have been a few big signings or extensions that the Brewers have given some of their players over their 50+ year history. With free agency quickly approaching, we’ll take a look into the top 10 biggest ones.

Here are the ten biggest contracts in Brewers franchise history.

#10: SP Kyle Lohse – Three years, $33MM

Kyle Lohse is most commonly known for his success with the St. Louis Cardinals, being a huge part of their 2011 World Series team. Lohse signed his three-year deal with the Brewers going into the 2013 season where he was dominant, pitching to a sub-4.00 ERA in his first two seasons.

In the final year of his contract, he struggled quite a bit, resulting in a move to the bullpen. He went on to put up a 5.85 ERA that season before finishing his career with the Rangers.

#9: 3B Aramis Ramirez – Three years, $36MM

In the winter of the 2011-12 offseason, the Brewers looked to fill one of many holes of players that left from the previous season and looked within the division with Aramis Ramirez. When he signed with the Brewers he was a two-time All-Star with the Chicago Cubs along with finishing in the top 20 in MVP voting for the National League four times.

He would end up leading the league in doubles (50) in his first year in Milwaukee, finishing 9th in NL MVP voting as well. He would make the All-Star game in his third year and then play for the Brewers for part of a fourth season before being traded to the Pirates that final year.

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